11 July 2019

‘Internationalisation is in our DNA’

As a university in a border region in the heart of Europe, we experience every day that the future also lies in Europe. A broad, pragmatic view of reality is needed in the debate on internationalisation that has intensified recently, with strong words and fearful images such as a 'tsunami of foreign students'. No, there is definitely no tsunami and yes, the arrival of young internationals offers significant benefits—not only for academic education and research, but for the entire country. Consider, for example, the growing personnel shortages in healthcare, education and technology.

Leading policy

Maastricht University (UM) has been profiling itself for years with its international orientation. With the support of the European Commission, UM has recently taken the reins of the Young Universities for the Future of Europe (YUFE), a pioneering alliance of eight top young universities that aims to facilitate the integration of higher education in the EU. Earlier this year, the prestigious Certificate for Quality in Internationalisation (CeQuInt) was awarded to UM as recognition of the quality of internationalisation in our education and the facilities that support this.

“We are considered to have a leading position when it comes to our international orientation“, says Prof.dr. Martin Paul, President of the Executive Board. “Moreover, knowledge has no boundaries and it would actually be crazy if a university were not international. We believe it is important that our students are able to prepare themselves optimally for an international future. The best way to do this is through intensive interactions with foreign students. I am proud that our policy is regarded as best practice in this area—and that more and more of our foreign ‘talents’ are now building careers at our Brightlands campuses.” 

The Netherlands benefits from international talent. 
Maastricht University attracts this talent.

Internationalisation