GTD Homepage
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Programme outline

Director: Prof. Dr. V. Mazzucato

Programme profile
The Globalisation, Transnationalism and Development research programme (GTD) brings together new and existing research conducted within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences that focuses on the Global South using a transnational perspective. The Global South refers to developing countries as well as recently emerging economic powers such as Brazil, Russia, India and China (BRIC). While its geographic grounding is the Global South, the GTD’s research approach centres on exploring North – South and South – South linkages. Researchers use a transnational perspective to investigate such linkages, giving the GTD its distinctive profile. A commonality is that research is strongly grounded in empirical, primary data collection work using mixed methods ranging from anthropological qualitative fieldwork to sociological quantitative surveys.

Key research themes
Research in the GTD focuses on two specific areas. The first area of concentration is transnational migrant families and networks. Research projects investigate the linkages that are created between people, places, things and events in migrant sending and receiving countries. This research aims to re-frame migration research that is usually conducted within a nation-state framework and does so by focusing on the every-day lived experiences of migrants and the people they are tied to in their countries of origin as well as elsewhere, paying particular attention to transnational families and social networks. Research is based on empirical investigations and multi-sited research designs mainly focused on Africa and Europe.

A second area of focus is on Transnational knowledge exchanges for development. Projects study new actors influencing the way development is thought about and conducted. Examples include the role of civil society institutions and their use of transnational platforms to influence development outcomes locally and the role of emerging economies in setting development agendas and providing role models for policy makers and elites in the Global South.

GTD funded projects
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Ongoing

Funded projects

GTD researchers are also participating in two centers that conduct migration research. These are the Institute for Transnational & Euregional Cross Border Cooperation and Mobility (ITEM) and the Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development (MACIMIDE).

Mobility trajectories of young lives: Life chances of transnational youths in Global South and North (MO-TRAYL)
Project leader: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato​

ERC Consolidator grant

The objective of the project is to develop a better understanding of the relationship between migration and young people’s life-chances by studying youth’s mobility trajectories. How the life chances of youths, defined as their educational performance, psychological well-being and transitions into adulthood, are impacted by migration is of relevance for European cities that are faced with a growing youth population with migrant background. At the same time, cities in the Global South, where many migrants in Europe originate from, are faced with large portions of the population of minors who are living without at least one of their parents due to their parents’ migration. There is growing concern in both academia and policy about how these ‘stay-behind’ children are faring. Yet little is known about how migration impacts young people in the Global North and South in the medium-term, in part because our conception of young people’s mobility patterns has to date been overly simplified (either they move once, or they do not) and a national perspective has guided research. This results in a lack of data that specifically looks at the different mobility patterns of young people and hardly any that has a longitudinal dimension.

MO-TRAYL will break new ground by studying simultaneously youths in the Global South who have remained ‘at home’ and those who have migrated to Europe by making use of unique new longitudinal data collected in the Global South as well as collecting new data in the Global North that specifically traces the mobility trajectories, the resulting different family compositions along the way, and how both affect life chances. Through a transnational perspective in which family members and events spanning home and host countries are brought to bear on life chances, MO-TRAYL aims to re-conceptualize youth mobility and families and add a longitudinal dimension to the study of migration and life chance outcomes. The project focuses on Ghanaian children in Ghana, The Netherlands, Belgium and Germany.

 

Migrant Life Course and Legal Status Transition (MiLifeStatus)
Project leader: Prof. Maarten Vink

ERC Consolidator Grant

When does citizenship provide a boost to migrant integration? A fast-track to citizenship can maximize the potential for settlement success of migrants, though too short a pathway can disincentivize integration. This 5-year project (2016-2021) investigates why, how and for whom legal status transition matters and, especially, how variation in policies between countries impacts on this relation. While there is much talk among politicians about citizenship being either a reward, or an instrument, of immigrant integration, we actually know relatively little about how this works in practice. What is the relation between naturalization of immigrants, getting the citizenship of a new country of residence, and their integration within the host society? This relationship is complex because not all migrants have the same opportunities or face the same obstacles when it comes to building up a life a new country. As result, not everyone has an equal interest to naturalize and this also affects the relation between citizenship and integration. The goal is to investigate the relevance of citizenship within the individual life course of an immigrant.

The MiLifeStatus project will investigate these questions comparatively, since the rules on how to acquire citizenship vary greatly between countries. In other words, context matters. We’re interested in finding out how this affects the pay-off of citizenship. Does it still matter if a migrant acquires citizenship after a long waiting period? Our hypothesis is that how –and when- you get citizenship also affects what it means to you. The project team will analyze longitudinal data from population registers in the Netherlands and Scandinavian countries and, in addition, longitudinal survey data from Germany, Canada and the United States. The research will focus on integration in socioeconomic domains, such as the labor market, living conditions, education and other quality of life indicators among first and second-generation immigrants.
Visit the MiLifeStatus project website and watch the video's about the project:

 

Chinese Heritage Tours and Adoptive Origin Stories: Towards a Transnational Adoptive Field
Project leader: Dr. Julia Vich Bertran

Marie Curie project

China has become the largest source of adopted children worldwide since its Transnational Adoption Program began in 1992. As these adoptees are coming of age, some are interested in exploring their roots. Simultaneously, as international adoptions have come under the scrutiny of critical groups in both sending and receiving countries, ‘heritage tours’ have become a popular way to satisfy the needs of different actors involved in international adoptions. Such actors include adoptees and adoptive parents seeking to better understand their child’s ‘roots,’ economically minded tour operators and adoption agencies in China, and critical Western-based civil society groups who advocate the psychological benefits for adoptees seeking resolution around their “genealogical bewilderment”. Heritage tours are thus where transnational kinning practices3 are played out, different notions of ‘belonging’ and ‘origin culture’ intersect, and broader state and organizational interests meet. As such, these tours constitute the ideal case for studying the transnational family-making process from a truly transnational perspective. Through a detailed comparative study of how Spanish and US adopters (the two countries with the largest number of Chinese adoptees), Chinese first parents4 , and Chinese and Western heritage tour agencies negotiate their different perspectives, my research will facilitate one of the first multi-sited and multi-actor perspectives on transnational kinning practices through transnational adoption. The study brings together recent literature on transnational families and transnational adoption and uses mixed methods from the social sciences and humanities to build a Transnational Adoptive Field approach intended to provide a comprehensive and crosscountry comparative way to study transnational adoptive family-making processes. The research involves ethnographic field research in three different countries, interviews with key stakeholders and narrative analysis. In a wider sense, this inquiry is a case through which we may scrutinize the shifting meanings that re-define familial and national belonging in today’s globalizing world. 

Migrations between Africa and Europe (MAFE)
NL-Coordinator: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato​

International migration from Sub-Saharan Africa to Europe is of major concern for both African and European policy makers. Within Africa, there is widespread concern about the loss of skilled professionals, but also growing government interest in the potential contribution of Africa’s diasporas and moves to incorporate migration as a cross-cutting issue in their Poverty Reduction Strategy (PRS). Meanwhile, in Europe, there is growing recognition that ‘selective’ migration may be necessary to meet the goals of the Lisbon Agenda, but significant and persistent concern about irregular migration exists. Yet both the scope of African migration to Europe, and its consequences for poverty, remain poorly understood, and as a result, policies are often ineffective. 

The MAFE project aims to fill this gap in knowledge by collecting and disseminating unique, reliable and representative data on the characteristics and behaviour of migrants from Africa to Europe, both documented and undocumented. Using these data, the project aims to provide policy makers with new and accurate analyses on the: 

  • changing patterns of African migration to Europe; 
  • determinants of this migration, and of return and circulation of migrants; 
  • socio-economic and demographic changes that result from international migration.

The basic hypothesis of the MAFE project is that international migrations are not simply uni-directional flows between departure and destination countries that respond to economic or demographic differentials between the two. Rather, flows are increasingly fragmented and dispersed, creating diverse ‘migration systems’ that critically affect the development of subsequent migration. 

The MAFE data will consist of comparable data between six European and three Sub-Saharan African countries (Senegal, Ghana, Congo). The data will be longitudinal and multi-level. In Africa, representative samples of about 1,500 individuals (non migrants and return migrants) will be randomly drawn in selected regions of each country. In Europe, about 150 migrants per origin will be selected in each destination country, that are linked to the African sample.

Effects of transnational child-raising arrangements on life-chances of children, migrant parents and caregivers in Ghana and The Netherlands (TCRA)
Project leader: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato

Transnational family arrangements are prevalent the world over with one or both parents located overseas and children left in their country of origin to be raised by an extended family member or friend. In some cases such arrangements are the result of stringent migration policies in Europe and elsewhere in the Global North, which make it difficult for families to migrate together. In others, they are the preferred choice of family members especially in societies where child fostering is a common practice, such as in many places in Africa. 

Yet despite the prevalence of these arrangements, little is known about them, and especially in Africa. Family sociology studies tend to focus on migrant families that live together in the Global North, while economic and migration studies that focus on countries in the global South concentrate on the effects of remittances, ignoring what migration does to family relationships. 

This interdisciplinary program investigates the effects of transnational child-raising arrangements between Ghana and The Netherlands on the three main actors involved: children, caregivers and parents by focusing on a) educational/job, health and emotional outcomes and b) how these arrangements function. It will also look at how three types of institutions: schools in Ghana, child fostering norms in Ghana and family migration laws in The Netherlands, influence and/or are affected by transnational child-raising arrangements. Four projects in Ghana and The Netherlands will answer these questions by using a multi-sited research design and mixed-method methodology.

Maastricht University collaborates with the University of Ghana to carry out this program.

Project website

Effects of transnational child-raising arrangements on life-chances of children, migrant parents and caregivers between Africa and Europe (TCRAf-Eu)
Project leader: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato​

The study builds on the TCRA program above on transnational child-raising arrangements between Ghana and The Netherlands and adds a cross-country comparative dimension by including Angola and Nigeria as migrant origin countries and Portugal and Ireland as migrant destination countries. 

The program seeks to understand three dimensions of transnational child raising arrangements: 1) How do TCRAs affect life chances of children who remain in the country of origin, their migrant parents and their caregivers? 2) How are TCRAs affected by migration laws in Europe and the institution of child fosterage in Africa and how are schools in African countries affected by TCRAs? 3) How do the different sending and receiving country contexts affect the functioning and outcomes that TCRAs have on the different actors? 

In so doing the programme addresses three important areas of scholarly and policy debates: migration and development, migration and integration and family reunification policies.

Maastricht University coordinates the study and collaborates with University College Cork in Ireland and Fafo Institute for Applied International Studies in Norway. NORFACE (New Opportunities for Research Funding Agency Co-operation in Europe) is a consortium of fourteen research councils (including the Dutch NWO) created to increase co-operation in research and research policy in Europe. 

Project website

The functioning and consequences of transnational child raising arrangements in South and North: Angolan, Nigerian and Ghanaian migrant parents living in South Africa and The Netherlands (TCRA-SAN)
Project leader: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato​

This program aims to contribute to the emerging field of transnational family research by systematically analyzing the effects of living in transnational families on migrant parents, by comparing the same groups of origin in South-North and South-South migratory flows. Parents migrate while leaving their children in the care of someone else in the origin country in order to ensure the well-being of their family. This leads to transnational families the world over with members spread in different nation-states. Such a phenomenon is present both in the Global North as well as the Global South yet we know little about the consequences of such family arrangements for the people involved.

The program complements two ongoing international studies on transnational child raising arrangements, TCRA (WOTRO/NWO grant number W 01.66.2008.012) and TCRAf-Eu (NORFACE-315) projects, in two ways. First, it adds a qualitative understanding to the systematic, large-scale comparative analyses conducted in the two aforementioned projects. Second, it incorporates an additional comparative dimension to the projects by including a South-South migration flow.

The research project proposes to study the same groups of migrant parents (Angolans, Nigerians and Ghanaians) in The Netherlands and in South Africa. This comparative dimension helps us investigate the differences between South-North and South-South migration flow effects on families. It explores factors that positively and negatively impact on migrant parents’ well-being, by comparing the same groups of migrants but in different migratory flows. Hardly any studies exist on transnational child raising arrangements within a South-South migratory context and none, to our knowledge, compare these to South-North migratory contexts. 

The total project consists of 2 sub-projects that together will answer the main research questions:

  • How do transnational child raising arrangements function amongst Nigerian and Angolan migrant parents living in The Netherlands and amongst Nigerian, Angolan and Ghanaian parents in South Africa?
  • What are the consequences of transnational child raising arrangements on parents’ well-being as defined by their job performance, emotional well-being and health outcomes?

Maastricht University collaborates with the University of Cape Town to carry out this program.

Project website

GTD PhD projects
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Ongoing

PhD projects

Challenging Masculinities? The institution of marriage for young Senegalese migrant men under conditions of involuntary return to Senegal
PhD candidate: Karlien Strijbosch
Supervisors: Valentina Mazzucato, Ulrike Brunotte and Pape Sakho (in Senegal)

During this PhD project Karlien Strijbosch investigates how return migration is related to ideas and perspectives about masculinities and the institution of marriage in Senegal. While the policy of returning unwanted migrants is widely applied across Western Europe, less is known about the follow-up; how do they build their lives under conditions of aborted migration projects in their country of origin?
Karlien will conduct ethnographic fieldwork in Senegal to better understand how the socio-cultural reintegration process of returnees works.  In particular, she is interested in how young men deal with societal expectations of being an adult man in Senegal and how they and their surroundings narrate their (migration) experiences. The PhD project is financed by the Dutch Scientific Organisation (NWO). 

Analysing the impact of parental naturalization on educational outcomes of children of immigrants in the Netherlands within a comparative perspective
PhD candidate: Marie Labussière
Supervisors: prof.dr. Maarten Vink and dr. Mark Levels

Marie Labussière is a PhD candidate at the department of Political Science at Maastricht University since August 2017. Her current project analyzes the impact of citizenship acquisition on educational outcomes among immigrant descents.
This study is part of the ERC-project “Migrant Life Course and Legal Status Transitions”. It is supervised by Prof. dr. Maarten Vink (University of Maastricht/Maastricht Center for Citizenship, Migration and Development ) and dr. Mark Levels (University of Maastricht/Research Centre for Education and the Labor Market).
She holds an engineering degree from the French National School of Statistics and Economic Analysis (ENSAE), and has obtained a Master’s degree in Social Sciences specialized in interdisciplinarity in Paris (École Normale Supérieure / École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales).

Citizenship and quality of life: analyzing the relation between naturalization, residential segregation, and health outcomes
PhD Candidate: Christophe Leclerc
Supervisors: prof.dr. Maarten Vink and prof.dr. Hans Schmeets

Christophe Leclerc is a PhD candidate at the department of Political Science at Maastricht University since August 2017. He holds a bachelor degree in European Studies as well as a research master in European Studies from Maastricht University. His master thesis focused on the link between social capital and voter turnout at general elections in EU countries. His research interests include: political sciences, sociology, and migration studies.
His PhD research addresses the relation between citizenship acquisition and immigrants' social well being, looking more specifically at residential outcomes and health status.
His PhD is conducted under the supervision of professor Maarten Vink and professor Hans Schmeets. Christophe Leclerc is a member of the MiLifeStatusProject.

4 PhD Projects within MO-TRAYL ('Mobility Trajectories of Young Lives: Life Chances of Transnational Youth in Global South and North') project:
MO-TRAYL is an ERC project under the supervision of Professor Valentina Mazzucato. The objective of this project is to look at the relationship between mobility trajectories and young people's life chances, including their educational performance, well-being and transitions to adulthood. MO-TRAYL focuses on youth of Ghanaian background in Ghana whose parent(s) have migrated to the Global North, and youth of Ghanaian background in Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands.

1. Gladys Akom Ankobrey: she will conduct fieldwork in the Hague, the Netherlands, exploring diverse mobility trajectories. Specifically, her research interest focuses on young people’s engagement in transnational spaces, and how it shapes their life chances. By following youths in diverse (institutional) settings, she aims to gain a deeper understanding of their complex lifeworlds.

2. Sarah Anschütz: Mobility trajectories and psychosocial wellbeing: transnational youth of Ghanaian background in Antwerp. Sarah will conduct ethnographic fieldwork in Antwerp, Belgium, investigating how living a transnational life affects young people’s life chances. More specifically, she is interested in how mobility between Belgium and Ghana brings youth in contact with different ideas and expectations of living well, and how this in turn might shape their appraisal of their own psychosocial wellbeing.

3. Laura Ogden: Youth mobilities and educational cultures among youth of Ghanaian background in Hamburg. Laura will conduct fieldwork in Hamburg, Germany, researching how mobility affects young people’s life chances. In particular, she is interested in exploring how mobility between different education systems in Ghana and Germany shapes young people's educational ideologies and expectations. She will incorporate participatory and visual ethnographic methods to help explore these questions.

4. Onallia Esther Osei: Mobility Trajectories of Young Lives: Life Chances of Transnational Youth in Ghana. Onallia will conduct fieldwork in various locations in Ghana, focusing on transnationalism, mobility and youth development from a child-centered perspective. If some socio-cultural and economic attributes of Western host countries constrain some Ghanaian parents from living there with their children; then such parents may opt for the choice of depending on the homeland to raise their offspring. As this may be the case for some transnational children in Ghana, this thesis seeks to understand how mobility and transnationalism shape Ghanaian parent-child interactive relationships. In so doing, the study seeks to develop a compendium of all moves by each participant during the transnational phase of their lives by means of a biographical approach. Again, the thesis will also be interested in understanding the processes through which Ghanaian transnational youth adapt mobility and transnationalism to shape their lives in realms of education, psychological well-being and transitioning into adulthood.

Social protection Across Borders. How Sudanese migrants in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom and their families in Sudan maken use of social protection, locally and transnationally.
PhD Candidate: Ester Serra Mingot 
Supervisors: Valentina Mazzucato  and Virginie Baby-Collin​

The purpose of this research project is to examine how Sudanese migrants, in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom (UK), and their families, in Sudan, provide support for each other, locally and across borders. This study aims to understand how migrants and their family and friends at home maintain and create new ways of supporting each other, both in destination and origin countries. The project will study both highly educated migrants operating in an expatriate world of high-skilled jobs, as well as economic migrants often operating between blue / pink collar and black market employment. In this second group, we include both low educated and educated migrants experiencing a social downward mobility in Europe, where their qualifications are not recognized. How do these two sets of migrants fulfill their rights and responsibilities towards people at home (nuclear or extended family) in order to receive or provide social security? What challenges do they experience in qualifying for formal social welfare in European countries, and how do they navigate these challenges in order to ensure security for themselves and their family? The project will look broadly at what kinds of social security is provided for in the different contexts, as it may cover a broad range of dimensions that aim to provide and insure a better well being for the migrant and relatives. The project questions to what extent notions of nuclear family, which underlie formal social welfare arrangements in Europe, are different or similar to the informal social security practiced by migrants transnationally.

This project is part of the TRANSMIC research programme (Transnational Migration, Citizenship and the Circulation of Rights and Responsibilities), which aims to explore the links between migration, citizenship, and development. The project runs from October 2014 until October 2017, in parallel to another project at Aix-Mareseille University (France), which looks at transnational social protection for latin American Migrants in Europe.

Mobile Youth: learning, travelling and growing up in and between Ghana and The Netherlands
PhD Candidate: Joan van Geel
Supervisors: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato and Prof. Hildegard Schneider
This project focuses on the mobility trajectories of Ghanaian youth who learn, travel and grow up in and between Ghana and The Netherlands. Youth all over the world increasingly have multiple localities in their biographies including both Global Northern and Global Southern societies. Youth experiences connections with more than one society simultaneously, either due to personal or due to parental migration. Moving back and forth between Ghana and The Netherlands for diverse reasons, these youth grow up in a transnational social field where they have to negotiate different identities, expectations, educational settings and cultures. But how do they do this? How do they experience and give meaning to their everyday transnational lives? What shapes youth’s educational experiences when they live and go to school in different countries?
These underlying questions are at the basis of this study that gives prominence to youth’s personal narratives and perspectives. Adult migrants are generally accepted as living transnational lives, meaning that they keep multiple linkages across national boundaries. Yet, for children and youth this remains a highly contested notion, partly because migration is a presumed negative experience in youth’s lives. Bringing in youth’s own experiences gives room to potentially positive conclusions that adults tend to overlook. Furthermore, by overlooking the transnational aspects of mobile youth’s lives, it remains unclear how they are affected by their parents’ and their own migratory patterns. Starting from a transnational perspective and taking youth’s own lived experiences as point of departure, we can better understand how youth give meaning to the transnational families they are part of, how they negotiate their position in different societal settings and what the most important motivating actors in their lives are.  
For in-depth knowledge on youth’s everyday realities, ethnographic fieldwork has been conducted following Ghanaian youth in The Netherlands and Ghana in a variety of settings. I have lived in a neighborhood where many Ghanaian families reside to conduct interviews, participant observations, informal conversations and less conventional methods such as a creative writing exercise. To increase my understanding of youth’s journeys ‘back home’ I have accompanied some of my participants on their travels during the summer in 2015 and 2016. I have also conducted interviews with experts and people who are working with Ghanaian youth on a daily basis.
This thesis aims to re-conceptualize youth migration and mobility by analyzing youth’s actual trajectories – including mobility prior, during and after their initial international move. The second aim of this study is to understand how continues engagement with Ghanaian society, or a disruption of such, relates to building resilience and self-esteem. These are welcome if not necessary assets to develop in youth in order for them to successfully navigate the Dutch educational landscape and society as a whole. Last, this thesis will concentrate on the tensions between the environmental expectations in Ghana and The Netherlands and the way this works out on youth’s views of themselves and their educational motivation. The overall claim is to critically juxtapose the general assumption that migration is merely destabilizing youth’s developmental pathways and disturbing their educational performances. In order to understand this, it is necessary to move beyond the scope of tangible, measurable outcomes and understand the meaningful serendipitous encounters that shape transnational youth’s lives.

This project is funded by MACMIDE (Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development) and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Maastricht University.

Transnational Child Raising Arrangements between Ghana and the Netherlands: Gender, Social Parenting Norms and Migration Policies in Shaping Everyday Lived Experiences of Migrant Parents and Stay Behind Children
PhD candidate: Miranda Poeze
Supervisors: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato, Dr. Bilisuma Dito and Prof. Sarah van Walsum (VU University Amsterdam)​

Since the 1980s, Ghanaian migrants have increasingly engaged in labour migration to the global North. Many migrants are motivated by the prospect of sending remittances to provide for family members who stay in Ghana. A large group of beneficiaries are children of migrants, who are either unable to life in the host country with the parent due to strict migration and family reunification policies or who the parent prefers stay in Ghana for reasons of cultural education or inability to combine paid labour with care for young children. Separated across nation-state borders, parents forge and maintain emotional bonds with their children through long-distance communication, sending of remittances and goods and, when possible, return visits. 
In the absence of one or both parents, children are taken care of by either the other stay behind biological parent or another caregiver, kin or non-kin. This calls for a reorganization and renegotiation of parental care tasks. In the Ghanaian context, local parenting norms revolve around social parenting norms, meaning that child care tasks are not only the responsibility of the biological parents, but also of extended family members. One of the practices in which these norms are informally institutionalized is kinship-fostering, whereby children live in non-natal homes during part of their childhood in order to obtain a better education, to help in the household or to strengthen kinship bonds. 
Through case studies of transnational families, partly matched and followed simultaneously in Ghana and the Netherlands in cooperation with Ernestina Dankyi, Ghanaian PhD at the University of Ghana, a qualitative account of parental migration is provided. In this PhD project it is examined how parents and children experience the geographical separation from each other and how filial bonds are maintained and forged towards each other. Previous research on transnational families has been largely influenced by feminist scholars who have mainly focussed on migrant mothers. In this study we also focus on the everyday lived experiences of transnational fathers as well as children’s differing experiences with transnational mothers and fathers. Furthermore, we pay particular attention to the way Dutch migration policies, which have made it increasingly difficult to obtain a long-term residence permit and to meet requirements to reunify with children in the Netherlands, shape experiences of migrant parents, the way they forge and maintain relationships with their children, and the way they negotiate care responsibilities with the caregiver. Throughout the study we examine the impact of norms of social parenting; how do they impact on experiences of parents and children? Does it temper some of the challenges posed by the transnational context? But also, does the transnational context pose challenges to local parenting norms? 

This research is part of the Transnational Child Raising Arrangements project (TCRA), in which both quantitative and qualitative researchers in Ghana and the Netherlands provide insight into the challenges of parental migration.

Transforming Transnational Social Networks in Transit: the Impact on Migration Processes of Africans in Turkey and Greece
PhD Candidate: Marieke Wissink
Supervisors: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato & Dr. Franck Düvell (COMPAS, Oxford University) 

This study investigates how ways in which irregular African migrants in Turkey and Greece shape their migration processes are associated with transformations in their transnational social networks. It is more and more observed that irregular migrants shape their migration processes by adopting various migration strategies (e.g. applying asylum, unauthorized border-crossing) over time, rather than by discretely moving from one country to another. This is the case, for instance, when migrants who intended to only transit a country, later decide to stay and apply for asylum. Yet, many migration studies build on migration theories where migration is still conceived of as a rather straightforward move, and where migrants are categorized based on one migration strategy (e.g. illegal migrants versus asylum-seekers). This study will de-frame how migration processes are typically theoretically addressed, and will systematically describe how erratic migration processes arise. 
Transnational social networks often play a crucial role in processes of migration, through the resources and support that are being exchanged through them. This is especially so in contexts where state support is weak. Yet, the existence and functioning of transnational networks is often taken for granted as a natural consequence of international migration, and the availability of information and communication technologies (ICT). This study critically re-thinks the creation and maintenance of networks, and their role in the migration process. It assumes that critical events taking place in the socio-institutional context in which migrants shape their migration processes, incite constant (re)construction of social networks, through which periods of loss and accumulation of social capital continuously alternate, affecting the way migration processes develop.
Data were collected during a longitudinal ethnographic field study (between 2009/2012 – 2013) among irregular African migrants residing in the transit contexts of Istanbul and Athens. These transit contexts are characterized by lacking or dysfunctional asylum systems, human rights violations, and a high in- and outflow of people intending or attempting to leave the country. The rapidly changing socio-institutional circumstances require or enable migrants to constantly adapt their migration strategies and social ties. These processes were investigated through participant observation, in-depth interviews, and ego-centric personal network surveys during several time periods among the same sample consisting of 40 migrants. 

This study investigates how ways in which irregular African migrants in Turkey and Greece shape their migration processes are associated with transformations in their transnational social networks. It is more and more observed that irregular migrants shape their migration processes by adopting various migration strategies (e.g. applying asylum, unauthorized border-crossing) over time, rather than by discretely moving from one country to another. This is the case, for instance, when migrants who intended to only transit a country, later decide to stay and apply for asylum. Yet, many migration studies build on migration theories where migration is still conceived of as a rather straightforward move, and where migrants are categorized based on one migration strategy (e.g. illegal migrants versus asylum-seekers). This study will de-frame how migration processes are typically theoretically addressed, and will systematically describe how erratic migration processes arise. 
Transnational social networks often play a crucial role in processes of migration, through the resources and support that are being exchanged through them. This is especially so in contexts where state support is weak. Yet, the existence and functioning of transnational networks is often taken for granted as a natural consequence of international migration, and the availability of information and communication technologies (ICT). This study critically re-thinks the creation and maintenance of networks, and their role in the migration process. It assumes that critical events taking place in the socio-institutional context in which migrants shape their migration processes, incite constant (re)construction of social networks, through which periods of loss and accumulation of social capital continuously alternate, affecting the way migration processes develop.
Data were collected during a longitudinal ethnographic field study (between 2009/2012 – 2013) among irregular African migrants residing in the transit contexts of Istanbul and Athens. These transit contexts are characterized by lacking or dysfunctional asylum systems, human rights violations, and a high in- and outflow of people intending or attempting to leave the country. The rapidly changing socio-institutional circumstances require or enable migrants to constantly adapt their migration strategies and social ties. These processes were investigated through participant observation, in-depth interviews, and ego-centric personal network surveys during several time periods among the same sample consisting of 40 migrants.

Trial by Transit: Exploring Transnational Personal Social Networks of Sub-Saharan Migrants in Ukraine
PhD Candidate: Natalia Gladkova
Supervisors: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato and Dr. Maarten Vink​

Hardening of border controls and tightening of migration legislation in the West have led to the diversification of destinations, including those with limited political or economic links with countries of origin. Complex, unclear and opaque visa application procedures encourage African migrants to actively search for alternative ways to overcome the impossibility of traveling. Thus, a country like Ukraine, even though it lacks colonial and historical ties with the African continent, is increasingly becoming a country of destination and passage for migrants coming from sub-Saharan Africa due to its geographical location. The emergence of “precarious transit zones” in the Sahara, the Mediterranean, Eastern Europe and in the Middle East, regions where migrants might spend from a few days to a lifetime, is associated with the form of human mobility often referred to as ‘transit migration’. 

The length of stay, as well as migrants’ survival in a context of uncertainty, precarity, and often illegality depend to a large extent on migrants’ ability to obtain resources and guidance through managing their interpersonal relations. In order to shed light on the lives of people on the move and the effects of their presence on the receiving society, it is important to look at the individual migrant as a member of a geographically dispersed larger whole, and as a person whose actions or inactions have repercussions, both in the Global South and in the Global North.

Taking a transnational perspective and being informed by network studies, this PhD project seeks to investigate how migrants create, maintain and use their transnational social networks in order to develop survival strategies and mobility in a transit setting. The study is based on data collected among male sub-Saharan Africans in Ukraine and members of their transnational personal social networks in Cameroon with the help of qualitative (ethnographic case studies, in-depth interviews, participatory observations) and quantitative methods (social network study).

GTD completed PhD projects
Niet ge- definieerd

Completed

PhD projects

Family Life & International Migration: How Ghanaia Families get Formed, Transformed, or Dissolved in the Context of International Migration.
PhD Candidate: Kim Caarls
Supervisors: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato & Dr. Bilisuma Dito​

While there is a growing body of literature about the effects of migration, the effect of migration for family life remains relatively underexposed. Moreover, migration studies often still focus on either migrant receiving or migrant sending countries; family sociology studies are mostly concerned with immigrant families, and the transnational family literature usually concentrates on the phenomenon of transnational family life, without comparing to a proper control group. 

Different family arrangements can emerge in the context of international migration, such as transnational families, whereby family members are living together-apart across different nation states. This project investigates differences between transnational, reunified, and unified families. Additionally, how family formation and dissolution patterns, such as marriage, fertility, and divorce, evolve in the context of international migration and provide interesting and necessary research questions. This thesis aims to contribute to the literature by providing a thorough understanding of the functioning and dynamics of families by adopting a bi-focal view when studying the interactions between international migration and family arrangements. 

This thesis is part of the Migration between Africa and Europe (MAFE) program, and it will concentrate on the Ghanaian migration flow (i.e. the MAFE-Ghana project). Retrospective biographic data have been collected on non-migrants, returnees, and migrant spouses in the country of origin, Ghana, and on current migrants in two receiving countries, the Netherlands and the UK (N = 1,645). Using discrete-time event history analyses, this thesis will analyze the interplay between family processes and migration of Ghanaians over time.

The Effect of Transnational Family Life on Angolan and Nigerian Migrant Parents’ Life-Chances in the Netherlands
PhD Candidate: Karlijn Haagsman
Supervisors: Prof. Valentina Mazzucato & Dr. Bilisuma Dito​

One of the main effects of increasing global migration is the change it brings to families involved, particularly when families are fragmented and dispersed across the globe. This is mainly due to parents who migrate to earn a living and ensure a better future for their children while leaving behind these children in the country of origin to be taken care of by someone else. By living geographically dispersed these families have become so-called transnational families, i.e. families whose members reside in different countries and, as a result, whose kinship ties extend across national borders. 

Studies on the effects of transnational family life have shown that family separation can have a negative impact on the wellbeing of both migrant parents and children. However, most studies have been qualitative in nature and have studied these effects without a control group and hence are not able to distinguish whether effects measured are due to separation or other migration effects. Thus, although the amount of research on transnational families is growing, there are almost no quantitative data on the extent, nor systematic evidence regarding the effects of transnational child-raising arrangements (TCRAs) on the parents’ lives.

This study investigates the effects of TCRAs on the life-chances (health, emotional wellbeing and labour market participation) of migrant parents by using survey data collected amongst 300 Nigerian and 300 Angolan migrant parents in the Netherlands. To assess if TCRAs have an effect on the life-chances of migrant parents we compare two groups of migrant parents, of which half has at least one child in the country of origin and the other half lives with all their children in the Netherlands.

GTD Events
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Upcoming

Events

Upcoming Research Colloquia organised by GTD:

 

  • Wednesday 9, January 2019: Stefan Ouma, Goethe Universität
  • Wednesday 6, February 2019: Robtel Pailey, University of Oxford
  • Wednesday 13, March 2019: Lovise Aalen, CMI (Christian Michelsen Institute)
  • Wednesday 10 April 2019: Isabelle Geuskens

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GTD Past events
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Past

Events

 

Research Colloquia organised by GTD:

Comparing Sending States’ Social Protection Infrastructure for Nationals Abroad: An Analysis of Diaspora Institutions and Consular Services by Jean-Michel Lafleur
When: Wednesday 5 December 2018

Finding Ways through Eurospace: West African Movers Re-Viewing Europe from the Inside by Joris Schapendonk
When: Wednesday 21 November 2018

Heineken in Africa. A Multinational Unleashed by Olivier van Beemen
When: 17 october 2018

The 'Southernisation"of development: Are DAC donors moving South? by Emma Mawdsley
When: 26 September 2018

Working with international business for the SDG's: how well does that work? by Joost Oorthuizen
When: 18 April 2018

Modernisation through a national prism: Legibility, development, and the public good in China's global vision by Ruben Gonzalez
When: 14 March 2018

Evaluating migration policy effects and effectiveness by Mathias Czaika
When: February 21, 2018

The Coming of Age of small-scale, voluntary development organisations, by Sara Kinsbergen
When: January 24 2018, from 15:30 to 17:00

Facing the obligation to belong: transnational engagement and construction of identities among Ecuadorian migrants’ children in Spain and Italy, by Simone Castellani
When: 6 December 2017, from 15:30 to 17:30

Can't Wait to Learn - An innovative education programme, by Ana Rodriguez, War Child Holland
When: Wednesday 8 November 2017, 15:30-17:0

The Authority of Peer Reviews among States in the Global Governance of Corruption, by Hortense Jongen, Political Science, FASoS
When: Wednesday 11 october, 2017, 15:30-17:00

Can the subaltern file claims? The World Bank Inspection Panel and subaltern articulation by Aram Ziai, University of Kassel
When: Wednesday 13 September, 2017, 15:30-17:30

Image Wars in Past and Present. Religious Matters in Pluralist Settings by Professor Dr Birgit Meyer, Universiteit UtrechtWhen: Wednesday, 24 May 2017, 15:30–17:30

Labour regime transformation in Myanmar: Constitutive processes of contestation by Dennis Arnold, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
When: Wednesday 5 April 2017, 15:30-17:00

Education for All, the North/South dilemma and decolonizing the minds by Clara Carvalho, Chair of the Center of International Studies (CEI-IUL).
When: 8 March, 2017, from 15:30-17:30

Theorizing Islamic feminism by Lana Sirri (Assistant professor in Gender and Diversity, Faculty of Arts and Social sciences, Maastricht University).
When: Jan 25, 2017, from 15:30-17:30

Decent work for women in global horticulture value chains; the case of the flower industry in East Africa by Caroline Wildeman (Campaign Director of Women @work campaign at HIVoS international).
When: December 7, 2016, from 15:30-17:30

The role of formal and informal informal information in migrant decision making by Djamila Schans (Senior researcher at the Research and Documentation Center, WODC). This colloquium has been organized in association with Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development – MACIMIDE.
When: Nov 23, 2016 , from 15:30-17:30

Financialisation and Development by Emma Mawdsley (a reader in Human Geography and Fellow of Newnham College, at the University of Cambridge)
When: September 27, 2016, 13:30-15:30

Retooling theory by Jan Nederveen Pieterse (Mellichamp Professor of Global Studies and Sociology at the University of California).
When: September 14, 2016, from 15:30-17:30

Indigenous Masculinities in Berber Morocco: Colonial Violence and Postcolonial Recuperations by Paul Silverstein (Professor of Anthropology at Reed College.
When: June 1, 2016, 15:30-17:30

A living fence: Inequality and the mobility of people, things, and money across the Haiti-Dominican Republic border by Erin B. Taylor (Post-Doctoral fellow at the University of Lisbon).
When: May 11, 2016, 15:30-17:30

The Humanitarian Narrative in context by Johannes Paulmann (Professor of Modern History at the University of Mainz).
When: April 13, 2016, 15;30-17:30

Where disaster meets conflict by Prof. Dorothea Hilhorst (professor of humanitarian aid and reconstruction at Institute of Social Studies, EUR)
When: March 16, 2016, from 15.30 to 17.30

Critical Transformations and Global Development by Jeffrey Henderson (Professor of International Development at the University of Bristol).
When: February 17, 2016, from 15:30 to 17:30

Migrant, the state, Petty Trade: People, goods, money on the move between West Africa and China by Heidi Østbø Haugen (Post-Doctoral Researcher at the University of Norway).
When: December 16, 2015, 15;30-17:30.

The Global War on Terror and Immigrant Organizational Agency: The Case of Pakistani Diaspora Organizations in London, Toronto and New York City by Ali R. Chaudhary (a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the International Migration Institute, at the University of Oxford).
When: November 18, 2015, from 15:30-17:30

In the Name of Development: power, profit and the datafication of the global South by Linnet Taylor (a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellow at the University of Amsterdam's International Development Studies department).
When: October 21,2015, 15:30-17:30.

Interrogating Development Theories through the Rise of the South by Emma Mawdsley (a reader in Human Geography and Fellow of Newnham College, at the University of Cambridge).
When: September 30, 2015, 13:30-15:30

'Transnational Islamic NGOs in Africa: Building Connections through the Charity Chain' by Dr. Mayke Kaag (African Studies Centre, Leiden). This colloquium has been organized in association with Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development - MACIMIDE
When: February 12, 2014

'Immigrants, ethnic minorities and the diversification of urban cultures' by Prof. Marco Martiniello (Centre for Ethnic and Migration Studies - CEDEM, University of Liege). This collouium has been organized in association with Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development - MACIMIDE
When: January 15, 2014

'Between Wish and Reality: Migration Aspirations, Intentions and Realisation' by Franck Duvell (Centre on Migration, Policy and Society, University of Oxford)
When: December 4, 2013 from 11.30 to 13.30

'Re-thinking the role of remittances in transnational relationships' by Jørgen Carling (Peace Research Institute Oslo, Norway) Organized in association with Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development (MACIMIDE)
When: November 6, 2013, from 15.30 to 17.30

'New maps of Africa? Contextualising the 'Chinese Model' within Ethiopian and Kenyan paradigms of development' by Dr. Elsje Fourie (Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Maastricht University)
When: October 9, 2013, from 15.30 to 17.30

'Transnational families and the circulation of care: a framework for the analysis of transnational care practices' by Dr. Laura Merla (Research Centre on Families and Sexualities, Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium)
When: September 11, 2013, from 15.30 to 17.30 

Other events
 

GTD Research Retreat August 2017: Embody your research

From Thursday 24 August to Saturday 26 August 2017 the Globalisation, Transnationalism and Development (GTD) research group went on a research retreat in Epen, the Netherlands. During the retreat, the researchers speed-dated, embodied their research during a performance, and engaged in knowledge sharing sessions and a book club. For an impression take a look at these pictures.

 

Symposium New Perspectives on Transnational Living

October 19, 2016, Maastricht University

Chaired by Dr. Ozge Bilgili (UNU-MERIT) and Dr. Karlijn Haagsman (FASoS), the event was organised jointly by the IMISCOE standing committee on Interaction of Migrant Integration and Transnationalism (IMITE) and the Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development (MACIMIDE).

This symposium brought together senior researchers who gave presentations based on draft papers from original research. Keynote lectures were given by Jørgen Carling, Research Professor at the Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) and Prof. dr. Godfried Engbersen from Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands.

We invited abstracts for conceptual and/or empirical papers that related to one or both of the following two themes:

Transnational practices versus transnational living — For several decades, the empirical study of transnationalism has concentrated on specific transnational practices, such as remittance-sending, communication, transnational entrepreneurship or transnational political activism. In an effort to reinvigorate the theoretical and conceptual development, we wish to revisit the issue of variation in types or degrees of transnationalism. Specifically, we ask whether we can identify forms of transnationalism that go beyond participation in transnational practices to more fundamentally leading lives that span two or more countries. If so, what are the hallmarks of such truly transnational living? And does it undermine the very notion of migration as a change of one’s habitual place of residence?

Transnationalism beyond migrants — Transnationalism has conventionally been seen as something that immigrants engage in. However, if we take a step back and use actual practices and ways of life as starting points, we may find that transnationalism involves a greater diversity of people with or without an immigrant background. There is a growing body of research on seasonal migration and transnationalism among native Europeans, for instance, but this is still poorly integrated with the broader migration literature and has yet to provide fundamental challenges to our conceptual frameworks. In what ways can we diversify our study of transnational subjects and thereby reconsider the meanings of transnationalism itself?

For a reflection on the symposium click here.

 

PhD Course New Perspectives on Transnational Living

October 19-21, 2016, Maastricht University

Chaired by Dr. Ozge Bilgili (UNU-MERIT) and Dr. Karlijn Haagsman (FASoS), the event was organised jointly by the IMISCOE standing committee on Interaction of Migrant Integration and Transnationalism (IMITE) and the Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development (MACIMIDE).

The three-day PhD course started with the attendance of the Senior Researchers Symposium on 19 October. The second and third day contained lectures by Prof. dr. Valentina Mazzucato (Maastricht University) and Marta Bivand Erdal (Peace Research Institute Oslo, Norway) on the concepts, theories and methodologies of research on transnationalism. On both days PhD students presented their research in smaller groups under the guidance of a senior researcher and received feedback on their work. And, finally, we included some workshops and a documentary screening.

For a reflection on the PhD Course click here.

 

Workshop ‘International Network on Transnational Families’ 

July 5-6, 2016, Centre for Population Change, University of St. Andrews

Workshop organizers: Prof. dr. Valentina Mazzucato, Prof. dr. Elspeth Graham, Dr. Karlijn Haagsman & Dr. Tatiana Eremenko

In this two-day workshop members of the international network on transnational families came together to discuss research, joint papers and future collaboration. This workshop was a follow up of the workshop “Migrant Families Living Across National and Regional Borders” which took place July 1-3, 2015.

 

Workshop “Migrant Families Living Across National and Regional Borders”

July 1-3, 2015

Workshop organizers: Prof. dr. Valentina Mazzucato & Dr. Karlijn Haagsman

The three-day workshop “Migrant Families Living Across National and Regional Borders” had as its aim to bring together scholars performing quantitative research on trans-local and transnational migrant families to explore future collaboration. In short, we sought to make cross-country comparisons on the effects of migration on families from a multi-disciplinary, quantitative and multi-sited perspective using the various survey data that these researchers have collected.  Such comparisons would enable a greater understanding of the driving forces behind the effects of migration on families by exploring questions such as: what aspects are generalizable across different contexts, and which contextual factors lead to different outcomes? Such a cross-country comparative exercise would be the first of its kind.

 

MACIMIDE PHD WORKSHOP 2016: “Ethnography in the city: contemporary challenges”

The Maastricht Centre for Citizenship, Migration and Development (MACIMIDE) organised a workshop on urban ethnography, May 30-31, 2016.

Cities are expected to account for almost all world population growth in the future and the majority of people will soon reside in urban areas. Increasing internal and international migration are important factors contributing to the ethnic, religious, infrastructural and legal complexities present in contemporary cities. This diversity and rapidly changing urban context are important sites and topics for ethnographic research and present challenges to establishing a meaningful ethnographic presence in the lives of busy and sometimes hidden populations. Ethnographic techniques such as ‘hanging out’ in a remote village in which observation of every-day life is conducted under the village tree and meaningful conversation emerges by happenstance, are unlikely to be suitable for urban inquiry. This workshop aims at offering young researchers a knowledge-sharing platform under the guidance of three senior experts with extensive experience in various urban contexts in the Global North and South.

The workshop was held in Maastricht, The Netherlands


“Transnational Child Raising Arrangements between Africa and Europe Conference”

An interdisciplinary conference organised by the Globalisation, Transnationalism and Development Research Program at Maastricht University

De kandelaar in Amsterdam, de Bijlmer, Amsterdam South-East, 26-28 June 2014.

The conference aimed to contribute to the gap in knowledge about the lives of transnational African migrant parents in Europe and their children and caregivers in Africa. On June 26, the conference opened with a policy round table to discuss the main findings of the project with policy makers and practitioners in the field of migration and development from The Netherlands and Ghana. On June 27 and June 28, researchers from the research project ‘Transnational child raising arrangements between Ghana and The Netherlands’ and external researchers presented their findings in a more academic setting.

This was the final conference of the research project on ‘Transnational Child Raising Arrangements between Africa and The Netherlands’ (www.tcra.nl) funded by the Science for Global Development (WOTRO) division of The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO)

Programme
June 26: Policy Round Table
June 27&28: Academic Conference:

Speakers:
Prof. Valentina Mazzucato, Maastricht University
Dr. Elisabetta Zontini, University of Nottingham
Prof. Eleanor Koffman, Middlesex University, London

 

FASoS Programme UM Dies Natalis: Public Lecture by Prof. Peggy Levitt

Maastricht, 10 January 2014

AMC was co-organiser of the Dies lecture: "Migrating People, Migration Culture: Concepts, Methods and Implications for Development”, by Prof. Peggy Levitt (Wellesley College and Harvard University) on the occasion of receiving an honorary doctorate from Maastricht University. Read more about this event here.

 

TCRAf-Eu Conference on Transnational Families

27-29 March 2013

The conference addresses methodological and substantive gaps in transnational family research by promoting multi-sited, mixed-method and comparative approaches. Invited scholars from different disciplines will present state-of the- art research on transnational families, focusing on children, caregivers and migrant parents located in different parts of the world. The conference is preceded by a PhD workshop in which students will present their work and receive feedback from peers and specialists in the field. The conference opens with a policy roundtable with stakeholders from different European and African countries. This is the final conference of the NORFACE funded ‘Transnational Child Raising Arrangements between Africa and Europe (TCRAf-Eu)’ project (www.tcra.nl).

 

March 27th Policy Roundtable: Migrant Families Living between Africa and Europe


We would like to share some of our emerging findings with a broader audience and experts in the field to discuss the possible policy implications our research might have. The research shows how conditions in sending countries are linked to integration outcomes in receiving countries and vice-versa, how integration in receiving countries impacts on development outcomes in sending countries. There are many potential policy relevant issues that are addressed by our project and the policy roundtable is intended to initiate a discussion on issues of migration and families and to brainstorm together how our findings can be brought to a wider public of policy makers, practitioners and the media.

 

March 28-29th Conference: Transnational Families: Multi-Sited, Mixed-Method and Comparative Research Approaches

Final conference of the “Transnational Child Raising Arrangements between Africa and Europe (TCRAf-Eu)”

Transnational families are a current and widespread phenomenon around the globe. The most common form is where one or both parents migrate and children are left in the origin country to be raised by a caregiver. In some cases such arrangements are the result of stringent migration policies in Europe and elsewhere in the Global North, which make it difficult for families to migrate together. In others, they are the preferred choice of family members especially in societies where child fostering and social parenthood are common practices. An emerging concern in both the academic and policy arenas is in the effects of separation on migrant parents and their children. Yet while multi-sited research approaches are advocated, few studies focus contemporaneously on both origin and receiving country contexts and the role of the caregiver is almost always missing. Furthermore, there are hardly any cross‐country comparative studies. Research on transnational families tends to cluster around two fields of study: qualitative, in-depth transnational migration studies and quantitatively focused family and child psychology studies. These two areas of study have remained largely separate of each other while much stands to be gained by bringing insights from these two areas of study to bare on each other. This conference aims to address such methodological and substantive gaps by promoting multi-sited, mixed-method and comparative approaches in transnational family research. The conference will bring scholars together from diverse disciplines and focus on different parts of the world and will be conducted in such a way for ample discussion around specific themes.

The registration for the conference has closed. For more information on this project please visit our website: www.tcra.nl 

GTD publications
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Publications

At this page you can find a selection of GTD publications between 2017-2011.

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

2012

  • Nauta, W.W. (2012). Democratic Deepening in South Korea and South Africa in an Age of Global Rebalancing: The Potential Role of Civil Society in the Era of Internet. In Nederveen Pieterse, J & Kim, J. (Eds.), Globalization and Development in East Asia (pp. 182-206). New York: Routlegde.
  • Nauta, W.W. & Stavinoha, L. (2012). Framing AIDS in Times of Global Crisis: 'Wasting' Africa yet Again? Globalizations, 9(5), 695-711.

2011

  • Programme outline

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  • Ongoing

    Funded projects

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  • Ongoing

    PhD projects

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    PhD projects

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    Events

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  • Past

    Events

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  • Staff

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