Latest blog articles by ITEM

  • law_blog_by_igir_e-commerce

    Tort law is needed to regulate intellectual property in e-commerce

    12 February 2021
    by: 
    ITEM in Law
    Current US and EU secondary liability standards do not address all factors to trigger liability. This influences legislation and case law, setting an uncertain secondary liability outcome of IP infringement cases against Internet Intermediaries’. I suggest that tort law can tackle this problem.
  • WOE

    Working on Europe: through break-outs, butterflies and bumblebees…

    6 February 2020
    by: 
    ITEM in General, Law
    It was an inspiring morning on an early December day at Maastricht’s industrial-charm Eiffel-building. A spacious and pleasant environment, framed with an engaging meeting format, invited the participants to find collaborators, promote their initiatives or simply brainstorm ideas about community and cooperation in the Euregion Maas-Rhine.
  • Will the European Social Model become a reality at last?

    18 March 2019
    by: 
    ITEM in General, Law
    More than 17 million workers living or working in another Member State are exposed to possible violations of their rights, either because of poor implementation of EU rules, disinformation or lack of coordination among Member States. Therefore, the EU plans to set up a new authority that will support fair labour mobility within the EU, allowing citizens and businesses to seize the opportunities offered by the single market while supporting cooperation between national authorities, including in preventing and tackling social fraud and abuse. ITEM cooperates with...
  • European Court of Justice allows Dutch tax credit reduction

    13 March 2019
    by: 
    ITEM in General, Law
    As of 1 January 2019, the tax part of the tax credit will no longer be automatically granted to frontier workers who work in the Netherlands but do not reside in the Netherlands. This constitutes an obstacle for frontier workers. ITEM has already questioned this before. Recently, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) issued an interesting ruling[1] regarding the other part of the tax credit, the premium part: in this case, the Netherlands may proportionally reduce this part over time.