NWO Vidi grant for physicist Keri Vos

Keri Vos (Maastricht University/Nikhef) has received an NWO Vidi grant for her work on precision studies of heavy ‘beauty’ particles, NWO announced on Thursday. These studies can help solve the mystery of the missing antimatter in the universe. 

Vos hopes to find currently unknown particles or forces that may explain why the universe is dominated by matter, while antimatter is absent. With the Vidi grant, Vos will study the decay of heavy beauty particles with extreme precision. She will do so by combining measurements from the LHCb experiment at CERN’s particle accelerator with improved theoretical predictions.

Inexplicable differences still exist between theoretical calculations and experimental observations of the decay of beauty particles. These could be signs of new particles, but researchers cannot be sure until they perform more studies. Vos will do so in close collaboration with experimental physicists from the LHCb experiment. This will allow them to get the most out of available and future data.

Vos: "I am incredibly grateful for this opportunity. This grant will allow me to set up my own research group at the interface between theory and experiment. I can't wait to get started with my team and to learn more about the matter around us."

Vos is part of the Gravitational Waves and Fundamental Physics group at Maastricht University, the LHCb experiment at CERN and the LHCb and theory group at Nikhef, the National Institute for Subatomic Physics.

NWO awarded a total of 97 Vidi grants of up to EUR 800,000 each. These grants will allow laureates to develop an innovative line of research over the next five years.

Vos: "I am incredibly grateful for this opportunity. This grant will allow me to set up my own research group at the interface between theory and experiment. I can't wait to get started with my team and to learn more about the matter around us."

Vos is part of the Gravitational Waves and Fundamental Physics group at Maastricht University, the LHCb experiment at CERN and the LHCb and theory group at Nikhef, the National Institute for Subatomic Physics.

NWO awarded a total of 97 Vidi grants of up to EUR 800,000 each. These grants will allow laureates to develop an innovative line of research over the next five years.

With thanks to Nikhef in making this post

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