Brexit FAQ for current bachelor's students & current master's fees

Maastricht University (UM) is very much aware of the result of the referendum on the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union (EU). Britain will not immediately cease to be a member of the EU; nor will it do so in 2016.

The referendum result will mark the start of the exit negotiations between the British government and the European Union. The regulations for a member state’s departure have been set out in Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union. This is the first time that this procedure will be used and as a result academics, and politicians are not completely certain how the process will develop. The exit negotiations are expected to last for at least 2 years, and it is likely that they will take even longer. During this time the United Kingdom shall continue to be a signatory of the EU treaties and a member of the European Union.

British students studying at Maastricht will continue to be EU students during the negotiation period.

Maastricht University and the Dutch government use membership of the European Economic Area (EEA) as an eligibility criterion for access to benefits such as a statutory tuition fee and a tuition fee loan. There are calls in the United Kingdom, including from the leave campaign, to join the EEA in the event of a Brexit (1).

Maastricht University will set up a special task force to monitor the impact of the Brexit on their British students.

Disclaimer: No rights may be obtained from this statement.

 

To join would require the unanimous consent from the 4 European Free Trade Association (EFTA) countries, and the British Government.

1  For further information please see p. 89 of HM Treasury Report (UK Gov), the long-term economic impact of EU membership and the alternatives (April 2016) & attached as pdf of page 89.   HM Treasury analysis: the long-term economic impact of EU membership and the alternatives

Can I keep paying the statutory rate in year 2?

The exit negotiations are expected to take 2 years, maybe even longer. During this period British students will still be EU students, you will therefore still pay the lower statutory tuition fee (1)

Whether tuition fees will change after Britain’s exit from the EU depends on the outcome of the negotiations. One of the criteria you need to meet to be eligible for the statutory tuition fee is a nationality of a EU or EEA country. There are calls for the United Kingdom, even from the Leave campaign, to join the European Economic Area. If Britain joins the EEA, you will still be eligible for the lower statutory fee, just like Swiss and Norwegian students (2).

If the UK does not join European Economic Area, you may be required to pay the higher institutional tuition fee once the Brexit goes into effect. At present this fee varies per course and per year (3). For more information, please visit our website.

 

1  Except where a Higher Fee applies, e.g. UCM & MA Forensic Psychology

3  Institution Tuition Fees, 2016- 2017.

1. Can I keep paying the statutory rate in year 3?

The exit negotiations are expected to take 2 years- or longer. During this period British students will still be EU students. Therefore, nothing will change in upcoming period.

2. What happens if I have a study delay?

The exit negotiations are expected to take 2 years- or longer. During this period British students will still be EU students. Therefore, nothing will change in upcoming period.

3. Will there be a transition phase?

The exit negotiations are expected to take 2 years- or longer. During this period British students will still be EU students. Therefore, nothing will change in upcoming period.

4. Can I get a waiver for the difference between the institutional rate and statutory rate?

The exit negotiations are expected to take 2 years- or longer. During this period British students will still be EU students. Therefore, nothing will change in upcoming period.

5. Can I apply for a scholarship?

There are limited scholarships available, mostly for students from non-EU/EEA countries.
 Please consult our website for further details.

6. Will the financial support system stay in place (tuition fee loan, general loan if you work 56 hours per month?

The exit negotiations are expected to take 2 years, maybe even longer. During this period British students will still be EU Students. As such, you will still meet the Dutch government’s nationality requirements for a tuition fee loan and student finance.

Whether you will still have access to these benefits after Britain’s exit from the EU depends on the outcome of the negotiations. One of the criteria you need to meet to receive funding from the Dienst Uitvoering Onderwijs (DUO) is a nationality of a EU/ EEA country (1) There are calls for the United Kingdom, even from the leave campaign, to join the European Economic Area. If Britain joins the EEA, you will still meet the nationality requirements for a tuition fee loan and student finance, just like Swiss and Norwegian students.

7. Will I need a visa to stay here?

The exit negotiations are expected to take 2 years- or longer. During this period British students will still be EU students. Therefore, nothing will change in upcoming period.

8. Will I need a work permit to keep working here?

The exit negotiations are expected to take 2 years- or longer. During this period British students will still be EU students. Therefore, nothing will change in upcoming period.

9. Do I need to change my application in Studielink/MyUM?

No, this is not necessary at this moment.

10. Will my degree still be recognised?

The European Higher Education Area (EHEA) –the organisation responsible for the Bologna process (introducing ECTS, recognition of degrees etc.) -, is an inter-governmental organisation outside the scope of the European Union. The EU supports this organisation, but a Brexit would not mean the end to British involvement in the EHEA. The expected impact of the Brexit on degree recognition will therefore probably be limited to non-existent.

11. If I graduate can I stay in the Netherlands/EU to look for a job?

The regulations regarding employment and work permits may change as soon as the exit has gone into effect. This may be problematic for jobs that require a specific nationality, such as positions at the EU Commission.